19th Century Cut Glass and Silver Chandelier by Osler

£13,000

the five etched glass dish shades supported on elegant tapering glass arms with aesthetic movement spandrels from a central cut glass shaft mounted with glass rod accents and silver plated fittings. Originally made for use with natural gas; now wired for electricity.

Height 120 cm (47.25 inches)
Diameter 124 cm (49 inches)
Design registered in 1879

The design for this gasolier was registered with a Patent Office Design Registry mark for 20th March 1879, registered design number 333560

The Birmingham firm of Osler was established by Thomas Osler in 1807, when he joined a Mr. Shakespeare’s glasshouse at Hockley. His sons Follett and Clarkson renamed the firm F. & C. Osler and by 1851, they were one of Britain’s leading glassmakers. The firm created a twenty-seven foot glass fountain, an eight-month undertaking, which formed the centrepiece of the entire Great Exhibition of 1851. Amongst their other displays were glass busts of celebrity figures, as well as a pair of eight-foot candelabra, now at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, which Queen Victoria presented to Prince Albert in 1849.

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